Current Watch Faces

At the moment I switch between 3 faces depending on what I’m doing.
My Watch Faces
The first face is using Infograph Modular and has pretty much every complication that I need or want through the day. When I use this face I rarely need to access other apps or open the dock.
The second face is Numerals Duo and gives me a distraction free clock that I can see from about a mile away, it’s great while doing most things and I just need the time.
The last face is using Modular and I use it when I sleep. Having the red text helps my retinas not explode during a quick check of the time while in bed.
These faces work great for me, especially as I find digital clocks much quicker to read and more accurate.

Dark Mode and Text Size

Recently, while listening to episode 273 (I think) of The Talk Show podcast, John spoke about having eye problems and that he had switched to full time dark mode and moved the text size slider one notch up on his iPhone. As I am always happy to try new things, I thought I’d give it a go and I have to say that I love it.

If you are not sure of the process I have some screen shots below of the process, first switching to full time dark mode (iOS 13 required).

Switching to Dark Mode

The next is increasing the text size, which could be increased more if you like.

Changing Text Size

I also added the text size quick adjust to the Control Centre screen just incase I want to switch back.

Adding Text Size to Control Centre

Lastly, as an added bonus, another trick I employed last year was turning off Night Shift, which reduces the blue light at certain times of the day. I am now just using the True Tone feature that newer Apple devices have. This allows the screen to adjust colour temperature to match the surrounding environments. This means that at night when I’m using on my “yellow” bedside light the screen also adjust. I highly recommend this change too.

Switching off Night Shift

Live AR Pictures App Part 5

Now the final part of my guides showing how to create you own Live AR Pictures app. This movie explains how to add fade transitions to the animations just to give the final product a nice clean look. This is much more complicated than the other guides and pushes the boundaries of my understanding so bare with my descriptions of what is happening.
I will add further guides based around this app but it will focus on additional AR elements or how might you include this inside your main app.

Live AR Pictures App Part 4

In this part of the series I am going to explain how we can add to our app so that when an image is not visible on the device that the animated movie pauses. This is a nice effect that makes the overall app feel more natural.

Live AR Pictures App Part 3

This is Part 3 in the series for creating a Live AR Pictures App. In this movie I show how to loop the movies and add more images to be recognised in your App.

Raspberry Pi Temp Sensor Part 1

Over the last few years I have been teaching a class called Mechatronics that combines together engineering and robotics with a goal for students to build real world technology to solve a problem. In building student learning for open ended tasks, I needed a project that could combine many skills together. I had previously used Arduino’s to enable a programmable device with I/O but I was happy bring in other technologies. I had also been coding more and more with Swift and making Apps with Xcode. As my students had also begun their journey with App Development in other classes, I thought it would be a great opportunity to leverage this knowledge and see how I could show live data from a temperature sensor in an App. So this lead me to the path of using a Raspberry Pi to become the hub of the project as I could basically build a database and web server that stored and shared data collected from a temperature sensor. This data could then be shown via an iOS app.

Essentially this series of guides will cover:

  • Setting up a DS18B20 temperature sensor
  • Writing a Python script to read the sensor
  • Setup of LAMP. Linux, Apache, MySQL & PHP for the webserver
  • Writing the values from the temp sensor to the MySQL database
  • Writing PHP scripts to access the MySQL database from a web browser
  • Outputting the results as JSON for a mobile app to read.
  • An simple iOS app to read our temp sensor values and display them

Live AR Pictures App Part 2

Now for the second part in a series of movies explaining how to make your own AR app using Live Photo’s. By the end of this guide you will have an app that will detect the photo and start playing the animated movie over the top. Don’t forget to grab your resources from the first guide and also print your photos.